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SPRING BAY MILL
 

Spring Bay Mill is a 40 hectare site-wide regeneration of what was once the world's largest wood chipping facility into a culture and environment oriented events venue. The site revolves around 3 new event spaces that have been created in and around remaining buildings and structures from the former industrial operation - the Banksia Room - a 250 seat function space in the former Administration building, The Tin Shed - a 230 seat performance space in the old machine servicing shed, and a large capacity outdoor Amphitheatre (with giant sundial) set in and around the former slew footing. Supporting these event spaces is a new group accommodation building called the Ridge Quarters and a field of glamping tents. Between each of these spaces and places around the site are a series of new pathways and landscapes that connect the parts of the site together and frame particular experiences of the post-industrial regeneration - including around the former Weighbridge that forms part of the new entrance landscaping works.

 

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2021 Australian Institute of Architects Tasmanian Chapter Architecture Awards:

> THE BARRY MCNEILL AWARD FOR SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE

JURY CITATION: Once the largest wood chipping facility in the world, the Spring Bay Mill has been transformed into an events venue with a strong cultural and environmental focus. An iterative process between client and architect has allowed the exploration and testing of opportunities to foster environmental, social and economic sustainability. Underpinned by immense ambition, the project is thoughtfully conceived and carefully executed, establishing key strategies for future development. An evolving, multi-staged masterplan embraces sustainability principles of loose fit, long life and low energy in diverse and interesting ways. A considered approach to the adaptive reuse of buildings creates new spaces that retain clear evidence of the site’s previous life. The minimal intervention addresses economic sustainability in both the light touch to demolition and construction, and also in the loose fit that allows for the testing scenarios to catalyse social and cultural engagement. Site remediation addresses contamination, and the expansive tarmac is being progressively replaced to reduce impact on storm water system. Extensive native and endemic planting, including rare and threatened species, is designed to be both aesthetic and educational, without being overly formal or didactic. A permanent plant nursery on site, facilitates community interaction and employment opportunities. Engaging with local builders, fabricators and tradies has also provided a boost for the local economy, which will continue as the site develops into a key visitor destination on the East Coast.

> THE ROY SHARRINGTON SMITH AWARD FOR HERITAGE ARCHITECTURE

JURY CITATION: "Spring Bay Mill is a civic minded piece of re-adaptive architecture built to provide important regenerative infrastructure to the East Coast. Engaging with social history and presenting future reinterpretations through varying art forms, performances and landscape. The architects have worked hard to integrate innovative program strategies to enhance the performance of the existing buildings into workable spaces without losing the integrity of their industrial past. From the big picture to the smallest details, Gilby + Brewin Architecture have remained focussed on the principles of Heritage.

> AWARD FOR PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE

JURY CITATION: An hour east of Hobart, the former Spring Bay Mill is emerging as Tasmania’s newest and most innovative events venue. After purchasing and decommissioning the mill in 2013, as a political stance against the state’s controversial forestry industry, the client recognised that its transformation required a ‘business model that works and an architect that listens.’ Gilby + Brewin Architecture’s long-term collaboration with client is key to the project’s success. Together they have transformed a destructive industrial site into a place of diverse productive social, cultural and environmental activities. Site remediation integrating civil works, landscape, architecture, wayfinding and lighting create a carefully structured sequence that guides the visitors between a series of new spaces that accommodate events of different types and scale, from intimate workshops to larger-scale festivals and celebrations. Three key spaces of different characters form the first stage of the project. The new function room, performance space and auditorium each inventively balance the formation of a protected micro-climates with a connection to expansive views beyond the site, towards Spring Bay and Maria Island. This unique venue provides a perfect complement to the rich and diverse array of cultural activities in Tasmania, expanding beyond the current focus in Hobart to provide a new cultural incubator for the East Coast.

 

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CLICK IMAGES BELOW FOR MORE DETAIL OF EACH PART OF THE PROJECT

Photographs Richard Jupe, Adam Gibson, Gilby + Brewin

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SLEW WALL AMPHITHEATRE

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THE TIN SHED PERFORMANCE SPACE

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BANKSIA FUNCTION ROOM

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RIDGE QUARTERS GROUP ACCOMMODATION

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ENTRANCE LANDSCAPING AND WEIGHBRIDGE FOLLY

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GLAMPING FIELD AMENITIES

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